5 Fertility Tips for Men Trying to Conceive

By Red Rock Fertility     Posted December 15, 2020     In

5 Fertility Tips for Men Trying to Conceive Header

Although infertility is often talked about as a woman’s issue, it has been found that in 20 percent of infertile couples, the problem can be traced back to the male partner. With male fertility being equally important to females, it’s crucial to learn about the factors that affect male reproductive health. Read the tips below to learn how to increase fertility in men and maintain a strong relationship with your partner in the process.

 

How to Increase Fertility in Men

 

Be Considerate of Your Partner 

While this fertility tip for men doesn’t affect your own physical ability, it does affect your relationship. Keep in mind that the drive to reproduce for a woman can be just as strong as the drive to eat, sleep, or have sex is for a man. Therefore, if your female partner is being slightly pushy about getting a pregnancy to happen, try to understand that it is a strong need and do your best to accommodate this desire by being willing to perform at a moment’s notice.

Also, keep in mind that female hormones are undergoing huge fluctuations throughout the menstrual cycle, and these directly impact a woman’s mood.

 

Increase the Color on Your Plate 

Taking control of what you eat is a natural way to increase sperm count and boost male fertility. For men, changes in diet can directly correlate with not only sperm quantity, but quality too. It is a well known fact that diets high in antioxidants, folic acid, and protein can have a direct impact on improving sperm parameters. Therefore, don’t be afraid to add some blueberries to the morning yogurt or choose a salad with spinach instead of iceberg lettuce.

 

Pay Attention to Your Body Weight 

The testicles hang outside of the body because they are not meant to be at body temperature. Sperm likes to be kept at a cooler temperature than the core body temperature. Men who suffer from increased BMI have more issues with abnormal sperm parameters. This is largely due to the amount of soft tissue surrounding the testicles causing them to be warmer than optimal temperature. 

If you find you do have this problem, there are a few fertility tips for men that alleviate the issue. Some things that may help are sitting with your legs open, wearing loose underwear, and in more severe cases, purchasing a cold gel pack to keep your sperm from undergoing heat injury.

 

Healthy Sperm for Male Fertility

 

Glass is Better than Plastic 

Plastic, especially when heated in a microwave, can give off estrogen-like chemicals. These chemicals confuse the hormonal milieu of a man and can have an impact on sperm production. They have also been related to the development of several cancers. 

A natural way to increase your sperm count and avoid these harmful side effects is to convert to glass containers when heating up your food. Stainless steel cups and glass dishes are two other solutions that are much better for you and your sperm than plastic.

 

Eat Organic  

Pesticides have a major impact on sperm. Sadly, they can be unknowingly consumed by eating the fruits and vegetables you pick up at your local grocery store. While pesticides are unhealthy for everyone, men are much more susceptible to chemical injury than women because the sperm is created approximately every 72 days and the DNA inside the sperm is constantly being developed. 

An easy fertility tip for men to implement is choosing organic food whenever possible to avoid harmful pesticides. If you cannot eat organic, it is also helpful to peel the outer layer of your fruits and vegetables to rid them of any unwanted chemicals.

 

The fertility process is vastly different for males and females, but it’s important to remember that there are challenges on both sides, not just one. To help improve your male reproductive health, be proactive and start by following these fertility tips for men. If you continue to struggle to conceive, learn more about determining when to see a fertility specialist.

 

Written by: Dr. Eva Littman, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
Practice Director